Rotational swing-Rotational Hitting & Linear Hitting: The Key Difference

Baseball has had a long running debate over whether a linear or rotational hitting style is better. Golf is clearly entering this debate with virtually all instruction and even training pointing toward the linear or lateral or sliding movement methodology. But while the instruction points toward sliding, the best golf swings we see today and in yesteryear are or were not doing it this way. So why is that? Is it that teachers clearly do not see with their eyes despite thousands of YouTube videos of great PGA tour golfers and golfing legends that are posted for free?

Rotational swing

Rotational swing

Rotational swing

Does he keep his front shoulder in? In my experience, it's Rotational swing possible to be successful at the major league level with a Linear hand path. As a result, I decided that I had to go beyond Mike Epstein's Rotstional. I have since used and refined my approach with a number of now major league hitters. Linear Hitting The linear philosophy tends to prize consistency over increased power. I would hope that my discussion of concepts other than Rotation make it clear that that is a Straw Man Argument. I can understand that. Then, in an attempt to fix something that wasn't broken, they developed an Rotational swing problem with covering the entire plate with power, I believe in part due to their efforts to not fly open. How to masterbate for him Rotation?

Babs nude. Making Rotation Work

You've probably heard coaches say "short to and long through. During the backswing, you need to make an excellent turn with your shoulder so that your back is facing the target at the top of the swing. This principal is one that I do teach. Josh Donaldson Swing Before and After. I am taking any and all constructive comments regarding this site because I want it to be the best resource for teaching Rotational swing hitting. In Rotational swing direct experience, Yale university sex shows Epstein's ideas and approach were a significant advance over the approach of Charley Lau, Walt Hriniak, Don Mattingly and others that I was taught. In this example, the barrel never gets behind the baseball. What does it look like when you do? If this list is appealing to you, it would make sense to look further Rotaitonal the possibility of using a rotary motion. Take everything through the ball and you'll see big improvements in your power and your ball striking. Swung hips will take over the action immediately, turning your lower body toward the Rohational while your upper body just comes along for the ride. You will always be weighing pros and cons when you Rotational swing decisions about your game, and that is certainly swin case when it comes to the rotary swing.

Despite the debate between Linear and Rotational hitting being an old one, to this day people often ask me what the key difference is between Rotational Hitting and Linear Hitting.

  • You need to have balance, you need to have a good tempo, and you need to lag the club nicely — just to name a few key points.
  • Rotational Hitting is the term that is used to describe Ted Williams' thoughts about hitting as laid out in The Science of Hitting.
  • Golf swing rotation is commonly perceived as the upper body rotating about an inclined axis of rotation passing through the lower back and out through the top of the head and at a right angle to the swing plane wagon wheel image of a central hub with the arms and club as the spokes.

There are two predominant schools of thought when it comes to baseball swing mechanics. Before we get into these schools of thought, let me preface this by saying a few things. There are only two types of coaches. Either you believe the best hitters ever did things correctly, or you don't. I believe that, although not quite right, rotational hitting does try to describe the movements of the best hitters of all time. Rotational Hitting. There are a few absolutes to rotational hitting.

They are.. Swing around the spine axis. Swing plane matches shoulder plane. Shown by Stanton above, this ensures that the bat is level with the shoulders and the ball. The problem with holding the bat with the barrel level to the shoulders is that you must turn your body to turn the bat. The barrel is traveling zero miles per hour. That means there is no running start, no momentum and an overall lack of swing quickness. This principal is one that I do teach. Without it, it is impossible to become a consistent hitter.

As I mentioned earlier, in a rotational swing, the bat moves only when the body rotates. This means, your body has to rotate as fast as possible. While this CAN be a good source of power, it is ultimately not adjustable enough to hit major league pitching.

Once the body rotates, any ability to drive the ball to the opposite field is bypassed in favor of turning to the pull side. With that said, this philosophy is very close to being right, the hands should stay back as long as possible, allowing the lower body to lead. Linear Hitting. Just about all hitters have some type of forward move towards the baseball. The idea behind shifting the weight forward is to generate as much energy as possible back towards the pitcher.

While I agree with the thought behind this concept, a weight shift forward without keeping the hands back can be detrimental. The linear, pushy hand path often leads to the weight falling to the front foot too soon.

You've probably heard coaches say "short to and long through. Where this hand path ultimately fails is in power production and adjustabilty.

The body works rotationally to produce force, there is no way to effectively load this swing. I see this bat path regularly, the typical result is a weak pop up or ground ball.

In this example, the barrel never gets behind the baseball. We can do better. Rotational hitting and linear hitting are no longer a viable way of describe a world class swing. The majority of great hitters load the barrel of their bat forward. This clip shows how the barrel is turned by the hands instead of being pulled around by the shoulders. This clip is an excellent example of matching swing plane to the plane of the pitch.

You should also notice that Longoria has tilted his shoulders to turn at a 45 degree angle, this keeps the bat "behind" the ball for as long as possible. If he were to keep his swing and shoulders level, his energy would turn "off the ball" sooner. Baseball Hitting Drills to Move Better. Cody Bellinger Swing Like the Greats.

Rotational Hitting vs. Gary Sanchez Swing Like the Greats. Josh Donaldson Swing Before and After. Manny Ramirez Swing Like the Greats. Chipper Jones Swing Like the Greats. Mookie Betts Swing Like the Greats.

Baseball Swing Cues Should you drop your back shoulder? Baseball Teaching Foot Down Early? Miguel Cabrera Swing Like the Greats. Prince Fielder Swing Like the Greats. David Wright Swing Like the Greats. Julio Franco Swing Like the Greats. Anthony Rendon Swing Like the Greats. Jose Bautista Swing Like the Greats. Albert Pujols Swing Like the Greats. Alex Rodriguez Swing Like the Greats.

Rotational Swing. Linear Swing. Elite Pattern. The Moneyball of Swing Mechanics. How to Load Good Hitting Position. The Longest Home Run Ever.

Aaron Judge Swing Like the Greats. Barry Bonds Swing Like the Greats. David Ortiz Swing Like the Greats. Baseball Coaching Swing Down? Kris Bryant Swing Like the Greats.

How to Swing Like the Greats. Babe Ruth Swing Like the Greats. What is Good Bat Path? Mike Trout Swing Like the Greats. Javier Baez Swing Like the Greats. Mike Piazza Swing Like the Greats. Click Here.

What happens from there? The Truth is that the swing has only one purpose; therefore it is only one move. Rotational Hitting. Where this hand path ultimately fails is in power production and adjustabilty. Everything in golf is about making tradeoffs — there are no perfect techniques or playing styles.

Rotational swing

Rotational swing

Rotational swing

Rotational swing

Rotational swing. Now Watch Chuck

Rotational Hitting is the term that is used to describe Ted Williams' thoughts about hitting as laid out in The Science of Hitting. Despite Ted Williams' success, Rotational Hitting is often dismissed or disparaged by the baseball establishment.

Ted Williams' ideas were even rejected by the Red Sox, the team Williams spent his career with. I talk about Rotation because Andres Torres -- my first client to be successful in MLB and my first client, period -- focused on it. He thought it was the key to his transformation and success as a hitter and said as much in this interview with Andres Torres in NJ. Andres had been taught to stay closed and throw his hands at the ball and I gave him permission to power his swing with Rotation.

I talk about Rotation because it is what the best hitters -- of the present and the past -- did and do. I talk about Rotation because of what I see in the clip below of Ted Williams hitting a home run. As you can see, HSSU achieved a dramatic improvement in its offensive performance in a short period of time during the season and sustained -- and improved on -- that success during the season. In sum, I have found that Rotational Hitting can work at the college, minor, and major league levels of baseball and fast pitch softball if you know what needs to be added to make it work.

I believe the problem people tend to have with Rotational Hitting is that Mike Epstein's approach to teaching Rotational Hitting is a flawed interpretation , and not a strict implementation , of Ted Williams' ideas.

What is required to make Rotational Hitting work is go back to the original sources and dig into what Ted Williams wrote and really said. One criticism of my work is that all I teach is Rotation, and that means that my hitters spin. I would hope that my discussion of concepts other than Rotation make it clear that that is a Straw Man Argument.

But that's not a problem if you take my complete system, and all of the concepts I talk about, into account. That is exactly what Mark Trumbo found when I worked with him in As I live in St. Louis, I came to understand Rotational Hitting, and the concepts that adapt it to the modern game, by studying the swing of Albert Pujols and putting together my flipbook swing analyses. Since , I've devoted myself to studying the swings of other great hitters, including Mickey Mantle and Miguel Cabrera.

In , my writings about Albert Pujols' swing attracted the attention of a career minor leaguer named Andres Torres Why do I talk about Rotation, given the baggage associated with the term Rotational Hitting?

Believe me, if I could think of a better word to use to describe what Matt Carpenter is doing in the clips above and below, I would. However, I can't think of a better term to characterize Matt Carpenter's swing than "Rotational. Ted Williams' focus on the Rotation of the hips stood in sharp contrast to what he felt was the over emphasis on Ted Williams knew the high-level swing combines Linear and Rotational elements.

What Ted Williams was aware of, and was concerned about, were the limitations of the overly or solely Linear swings that were being taught in the 70s and 80s. He knew they were working only due to the nature of the ballparks of the era; gigantic fields where a thin layer of Astroturf covered a hard layer of concrete.

That is why I lead with the concept of Rotation, even though the high-level swing is both Linear and Rotational. I'm just trying to get hitters back to the balance of Linear and Rotational elements that Ted Williams employed.

However, if you listen to MLB oaches and analysts, many seem to be fixated on trying to coach Rotation completely OUT of players' swings, likely because that is what they were taught and it is what worked in their era. However, while limiting Rotation can work as a cue for some hitters, it doesn't reflect reality ; it's not what great hitters like Ted Williams or Mickey Mantle actually did. Unfortunately, players like the one above are being coached OUT of Rotation and Mickey Mantle's swing -- by a now-MLB hitting coach -- and are being coached out of baseball.

I learned that lesson the hard way when trying to use Mike Epstein's, Jack Mankin's, and Paul Nyman's ideas when working with my older son. I have since used and refined my approach with a number of now major league hitters.

Does he keep his front shoulder in? The self-evident truth of Rotation led me to study both Ted Williams' ideas and Mike Epstein's approach to teaching them. What Mike Epstein taught was subtley, but as I was to learn, significantly different than what Albert Pujols did. I then began an intense, in-depth analysis of Albert Pujols' swing , including putting together a number of now-famous flipbook swing analyses.

I continue to think and talk about Rotation, and use the term Rotational Hitting, because I think it remains an important and useful concept, especially given the proliferation of cues like As a kid, I loved the game of baseball. However, I was never a great hitter. As I had kids of my own and coached them and their friends, I resolved to teach them better than I was taught. However, and following some very good advice, I eventually realized I needed to drill down to and read Ted Williams' own words and ideas, not Mike Epstein and Steve Ferroli's interpretations of them.

All the while, I was independently studying what the best baseball players actually do, starting with my flipbook analysis of Albert Pujols swing. To understand why the term Rotational Hitting made -- and still makes -- sense, you have to understand what Charley Lau and his disciples like Walt Hriniak were teaching during Mike Epstein's day and, in many cases, still teach. In sum, the Lau approach, at least when it comes to the lower body, is that all the power comes from the stride.

There is no separation or torque. The hips, shoulders, and hands move together because it is believed that any rotation of the hips will cause the front shoulder to fly open.

Given that the high-level swing combines both linear and rotational components, and the term Rotational Hitting carries with it significant baggage due to Mike Epstein, why would anyone still focus on Rotation and not something else? I was reminded of the value of the concept of Rotation during the fall practices of the college baseball team I work with.

The problem was, when looking at video of their swings, too many of our hitters were using terms like "Flying open" to criticize what were, in truth, good swings.

Once you have selected the general shape that will guide your swing, you can get down to work on mastering your move in order to create quality shots time after time.

In the content below, we are going to take a close look specifically at the rotary golf swing. Before deciding to take your game in this direction, you should understand the strengths and weaknesses of this swing shape. Everything in golf is about making tradeoffs — there are no perfect techniques or playing styles. You will always be weighing pros and cons when you make decisions about your game, and that is certainly the case when it comes to the rotary swing.

If you do decide that this is the right path for your swing, you should know exactly what you are getting into before starting. There are many quality golfers who use a rotary-style swing, including some of the best players in the world. You will likely find that there is a lot to like about this type of golf swing, and hopefully those positives will outweigh the few negatives that come along with it.

If you are willing to work hard on your technique by putting in time at the driving range, there is a good chance that a rotary golf swing could lead you to some of the best play of your life. In reality, you probably already have some of the elements of a rotary swing within your current technique. Remember, you aren't starting your swing from scratch when you decide to go in a new direction — you already have a swing that needs to be considered.

As you try to go down the path of a rotary swing, make sure you are thinking about your current technique as you make adjustments to bring all of your mechanics together into a cohesive unit. All of the content below is based on a right handed golfer. If you happen to play left handed, please take a moment to reverse the directions as necessary. The Strengths of a Rotary Swing. If you didn't stand to gain anything from altering your technique toward a rotary swing , there would be no point in making changes to your swing in the first place.

So, with that in mind, the first thing you need to understand is what you stand to gain if you focus on swinging in a rotary fashion. If this list is appealing to you, it would make sense to look further into the possibility of using a rotary motion. As you can see, there is a lot to like about this kind of golf swing. The list above shouldn't be considered complete, either — there are likely many other benefits that you could discover once you get started.

However, even if you only benefit in the four ways listed above, you will still be well on your way to a vastly improved golf game. The Drawbacks of a Rotary Swing. There are always drawbacks. No matter what kind of technique you are considering, you are going to have to be willing to take the bad with the good. Nothing is perfect in golf, despite the fact that many players spend their entire golfing lives looking for that perfect swing, perfect club, or perfect putting stroke.

You will be much better off as a golfer if you put the notion of perfection out of your mind as soon as possible. So, before you get started transitioning your game to use a rotary swing , it is important that you understand some of the drawbacks that may come along with this technique. Just as was the case with the 'strengths' section, not all of these drawbacks are going to affect every player. You may not have any of the issues below come up in your game, which would obviously be great news.

However, even if one or two of these problems does pop up, you still may find that the strengths of this technique make it worth dealing with the drawbacks. None of the points on the list above should be considered a 'deal breaker'. As was mentioned previously, golf is all about making trade offs, so you are going to have to decide if the pros outweigh the cons for your personally.

For some players, this will be an easy decision, as the gains they make with their full swing will overshadow any small negatives.

Rotational Hitting Drills • Tips • Mechanics • Baseball Softball • Trainer

Baseball has had a long running debate over whether a linear or rotational hitting style is better. Golf is clearly entering this debate with virtually all instruction and even training pointing toward the linear or lateral or sliding movement methodology. But while the instruction points toward sliding, the best golf swings we see today and in yesteryear are or were not doing it this way.

So why is that? Is it that teachers clearly do not see with their eyes despite thousands of YouTube videos of great PGA tour golfers and golfing legends that are posted for free? The promoters of lateral movement have a couple of very good reasons for wanting a slide in the downswing. No one wants to hit fat shots or slices. I can understand that.

I can see how sliding will fix a fat shot or help with slicing the ball. But is it the only way? I started learning golf back in when Jack Nicklaus was still dominant.

Everyone copied Jack since he was clearly the best. That was probably way overdone. See Hal Sutton since he was probably best example of a Ballard swing. The lateral slide typically goes from right heel to left toes thus making the slide a bit toward the right of target and closer to the ball.

Then this causes a jump and an early posterior pelvic tilt thrust that causes loss of spine angle. Hmmmmm, say one thing and do another??? Well people can say it is the evolution of a teacher. It has helped thousands of golfers up to a point. Homer did the best job he could with the limited resources he had. He did not have access to the thousands of high speed videos that are available on YouTube.

So what he did was use physics and engineering concepts to describe what he thought was going on in the golf swing. While I am not a big fan of studying physics, I do understand enough to know that there are some curious and perhaps counterproductive concepts from Homer that can have you fighting your swing for the rest of your golfing career. Advocates of the methods will say that there are tour pros using the method and are very successful.

I agree, but to what level? When Tiger Woods, the best golfer on the planet cannot make the variant of TGM work, how will the average Joes perform? Thus high level golf is unavailable to the great student that only does what is told. Tiger is one of those great students. I digress.

Supposedly to provide a structure to the golf swing. From a physics standpoint, I say it is going to increase the moment of inertia of the body therefore decrease the swing speed.

This is the ice skater extending the arms out. It slows rotation thus swing speed. Well, the advocates have a solution for that. If you slide enough, you can get your low point in front of the ball despite having an overly flat swing and an early casting of the wrists.

So you see, this is how sliding is imperative and is the Savior. Is there a home run hitter in baseball left loading or having the weight on the front foot? So from a power standpoint, left loading or leaning the spine toward the target makes no athletic sense.

Also how does one hit a driver well with that idea? Also, the advocates of this method do agree that if you slide long enough or have the endless slide, you will eventually rotate. Slide endlessly and you will rotate. Hmmm, is that logical? If you slide endlessly then rotate post impact, the rotation contributes nothing to the speed of the club. Science of golf and biomechanics has become the fad.

Along with that comes truly unscientific or science fiction to those that love those thrillers. But this time the storm is created by the scientists. Global warming is also a hot topic amongst scientists but at least you have an ongoing debate. They believe it is so, so shall it be. If that is all true, then why do the best long drive competitors continue to rotate rather than slide?

Is it because they only listen if helps them hit it longer? In a sport where only the longest wins, the long drive competitors are truth detectors and can see through the marketing. Holding lag long enough can do the trick. When describing the shortest distance between two points, a straight line is the shortest. But in the case of the golf swing, the widest distance of the arc is also where the low point of the arc is. But what happens when your typical recreational golfer hits the ball? Well, if they release lag too early, their left arm matches the shaft way before impact.

Thus the arc is widest before the ball and this makes for a lot of fat shots. As we can see, this golfer is trying to compensate for early release or casting by moving the ball farther behind in his stance. Clearly, it might help, but his left shoulder is way in front the ball and he still hits it fat. Is the lateral shift the answer?

Or is that because they are teaching to cast right arm extensor action? There you have it. The answers or solutions to the problem by both sides is completely different. But as I have said, if World is flat. Argumentum ad populum. Another huge debate involves the never ending cure for the slice.

Rotation, in their eyes is the evil that causes the nasty slice. They believe that the spinning of hips and shoulders causes the over the top move, steep downswing and the path swung so far left that it creates the banana ball slice that we often see a beginner struggle with.

That is understandable. For slicers that have sought traditional golf instruction, do teachers know how to square the club face and get it stable? For the rotational advocate, since the spine is viewed as bendable rather than a straight, stiff rod, the lack of right lateral bend and loss of lordosis is the root cause of slicing. Rotation is encouraged but not only with the pelvis or only shoulders but a coordinated whole body rotational effort via lateral bend and lordosis. Clearly we must continue to understand the movements of the body and how we can attack swing flaws at the root rather than giving a quick fix.

Trading one swing flaw for a lesser swing flaw does make some sense, but then how does the student progress in the long run? Home Linear vs Rotational Golf Swing. Does it look like Hogan on the right? Another interesting fundamental promoted by the advocates of this method is the left loading. This is where you use spine extension to keep your body leaning left on the backswing, then along with the slide will help you hit the ball cleaner increased negative attack angle with irons.

A home run hitter in baseball rotates immediately after the step therefore the powerful rotation is used to create bat speed. There is no one at the MLB home run derby with a lateral slide and restriction of rotation. The chest and belt buckle are practically pointed at the pitcher at impact. Huge rotation.

Rotational swing